Blog

Good communication, for great plumbing service

Jason Advantage - Monday, April 08, 2013

There seems to be a World Day for nearly everything now, and the plumbing industry is no exception. March 13, if you weren't aware, is World Plumbing Day. According to the World Plumbing Council, which initiated the event,it's an important reminder of the vital – and sometimes misunderstood – role that plumbers play every day around the world in helping keep us safe and healthy.

Indeed, in providing us with clean water and good sanitation, plumbers may work in a whole range of areas, and they may specialise in residential or commercial plumbing practice. Having some idea of the services offered, and exactly what service you need, is the first step in finding the best plumber for your needs.

Questions for quality

Obviously, we call a plumber for a reason. We're not an expert in the plumbing field and we need someone who can assist with issues. According to the Victorian Plumbing Industry Commission, there are eight areas of plumbing - water supply, gas fitting, sanitary, roofing (storm water), drainage,mechanical services, fire protection and irrigation (non-agricultural). To the untrained eye, that's an awful lot of ground to cover, so to find out exactly what's involved in your particular plumbing job, it's important to ask questions.

What to look for

At every stage of dealings with prospective or current plumbing contractors, it's important to have open conversation. You need to ensure that you find a plumber who is free, and agreeable to answering any questions and offering advice before, during and after any work done. Doing a little research on your own may also be useful, but in essence, a good contractor will provide background to the processes involved and what to expect in terms of the amount of building work required, time frame, the extent to which it might disrupt your home or business, and cost.

Get it in writing

While open conversation and a willingness to answer questions are good, getting it in writing is even better. Always obtain written quotes, and do ensure they are detailed and itemised. A quote should contain terms of materials and services, so you aren't left with any nasty surprises after the job is finished.

If you find your prospective plumbing contractor is evasive or unhelpful, your good sense should tell you to avoid them at all costs. Do always ask to see their identification and plumbing licence (it's a legal requirement). Write down the details including licence number and expiry date. In the event of any conflicts or problems further down the track, you'll then have a safeguard to ensure you're not left with an unfinished or unsatisfactory job.